News + Resources

Cultivating Urban Youth Entrepreneurs

L. Brian Jenkins, MA - Thursday, September 06, 2012

 

Challenge provides opportunity for change.

This is a common experience for most entrepreneurs who are challenged to provide their own solutions to the problems they face. Struggle is the birthplace of innovation, but one must be prepared with the right tools to overcome adversity. With the proper cultivation, ordinary individuals may become innovative entrepreneurial leaders, creating solutions versus being entrapped by problems that plague their communities. The entrepreneurial process strengthens the innate ability to create solutions, but this strength must be honed and fostered.

America’s three sports deities, the National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and the National Basketball Association (NBA) (I’m a fan of them all!) together represent one of the most highly revered talent pools in the United States. Each franchise, regardless of the sport, has a clear focus, expectation and invests capital with one goal in mind—winning. Participation at this level is highly selective. Most players have natural ability and talent within their sport often recognized in their youth. This leads to a training process, sometimes beginning as early as 5 years old or younger, and it typically involves someone, usually a coach, who has the experience to recognize talent and groom it to its full potential.

Where are those talent identifiers for potential entrepreneurs? What traits should they look for? Are those who teach in our classrooms, minister to our children, and serve as counselors at summer camps trained to recognize innate entrepreneurial abilities? How do you groom innovative entrepreneurial talent?

Great question. . .

 

1. Identify Urban Incubators

I believe the entrepreneurial incubators, particularly in the United States, already exist as schools, community organizations, places of worship, as well as the growing socially-networked global communities. Equipped with the tools, tech, training, and marshaling resources to compete in the marketplace, I’m convinced a crop of well-trained entrepreneurs can be seeded, sown, and harvested in their own communities. By providing entrepreneurs with solution based tools and resources such as StartingUp Now we can help cultivate their innate ability to create solutions in their own communities.

 

2. Expect Success

It is necessary to provide entrepreneurial facilitators effective solution-based tools intentionally designed to create operational businesses. This begins with a fundamental belief that the student can indeed, with the training, operate the business. Training connotes expectation. Train for success.

Within the context of football, a team practices all week, oftentimes twenty hours or more to play for a total of sixty minutes. The team is often able to quickly learn if their conditioning (preparation), game plan (business plan), and outcome (achieved goals) resulted in a win or a loss. It is also absolutely necessary, regardless of a win or a loss, for the team to review the game film with their coaches to improve each week. Teams DO NOT train to fail—failure is an obstacle to overcome. Therefore, we must position the entrepreneurial facilitator with effective resources with the expectation to train successful entrepreneurs.

 

3. Seek Challenge

Youth in challenged urban environments are highly intelligent, adaptable, and often solve their own problems. However, they are still youth and need the assurance that someone, their “coach”, will be there to assist with their business and personal development. The new startup provides opportunities for students to apply the skills learned in the planning process—it’s their business. We entrepreneurial instructors must learn to coach the business not control the business. The student must learn if their plan resulted in their intended outcome. Their network will multiply as they create new relationships, solve business trials, and begin to see difficulties as opportunities to be solved.  Their entrepreneurial mindset is shaped by both their successes, failures, and their resolve is increased by their ability to overcome. Students discover the power of decision-making and the implication of poor choices.  These experiences mold them as the future business leaders.

The startup provides ownership, accomplishment, allowing for a goal they set, achieved, and serves as a platform for other students to emulate. Through the rigors of operation, they learn that business is dependent upon their reputation providing ample opportunity to realize “Treat others as you want to be treated,” and the benefit thereof.  By growing urban entrepreneurs with values that exceed their own self-interest, we intrinsically train these future leaders that operating a successful business requires service to their family, community, country and others under their influence.


Entrepreneur Spotlight: Randi Craigen

Jason Huang - Thursday, August 30, 2012

 Sometimes the greatest challenge to success is knowing where to start. Randi Craigen found her focus through StartingUp Now.

Randi Craigen is the Chicago director of East Wind Nannies as well as an emerging jewelry designer who had once never thought she would run a business. A mother of four and proclaimed introvert, Randi took the inspiration of friends and the tools and support she gained from StartingUp Now, and is now working on making two dreams a reality. Randi has lived in Chicago for over twenty years, and faces both the challenges and excitements of marketing to the city’s unique needs and culture.

How did you get started with your nanny business?

I was working as a part time teacher’s aid at a preschool, and a friend of mine asked me how my job was going. I told her I was thinking about taking a nanny position instead, so that I could really focus on just a couple of kids and really relate to them and invest in them, rather than crowd control with twenty-some kids. She said to me, why don’t you open a branch at my nanny agency. She was looking to expand, and I said sure let’s talk. As we talked more about it, I realized it was something I could do and would enjoy doing. I didn’t have to start from zero; I could take her plan and her structure, and I could work from there. I still felt by doing that I could invest in kids by helping find quality nannies to care for them while their parents were at work.

How did you learn about StartingUp Now?
I’ve known Brian for about twenty years. I didn’t know exactly what StartingUp was about, but I knew that Brian was kind of a small business guru. I started with this agency in Chicago, which is pretty much just me. I quickly found myself in over my head, and I thought what am I supposed to do? Even though some things were already laid out for me, reaching the Chicago market, you know, that was all on me. So I went to his office to talk to him about small business, and Brian did everything to get me involved, from dropping the book in my lap to walking past me and checking up on me to making sure I was working on things.
 
What has been your experience with StartingUp Now?
I’m still honestly working through some things on it, but I think the greatest benefit I’ve had thus far is clarity. When I first talked to Brian, I wasn’t sure how helpful it was going to be, because figuring out the business plan and start up costs had essentially been done, or so I thought. However, it really helped me to understand just what it was I was marketing, what my product actually was. I thought my product was nannies, and that’s not my product; my product is really the very personalized customer service that I provide for families by doing the nanny search for them. That makes a difference in how I market it.

Brian also showed me the Skillcenter, and I was fiddling around with it and realized how easy it was. There was a question on startup costs that I didn’t exactly know what it was, and there was a link that I could click on immediately that went to an article that explained it; it’s so user friendly.

So after going through StartingUp Now, how has your outlook on entrepreneurship changed?
I just think differently; I see the opportunities in things. It’s funny to me how even talking to my daughter this summer, when she had requests to do face painting at a birthday party, I was just flowing with ideas about how to turn that into a business for her and how she could market that and how she needed to lay out a plan and all these different things on how to market herself as a face painter for birthday parties and earn a little bit of money. I’m planning these little businesses every time I turn around.

About a year and a half ago I started making jewelry just for friends and as gifts. A couple friends would ask, “Can you make something for my mom, and I’ll pay you for it.” People were liking what I was doing, so I started looking for little opportunities, Christmas shows where I could set up a little table and trunk shows for friends, but I never planned on making it a business. It’s just sort of been happening on the side. Now I love making it so much that I have all this product sitting around that nobody knows about really; nobody knows my little secret. Brian has been talking to me about how crazy that the product is already there, the investment is already made, so he’s really pushing me through the business side of it.

Where do you hope to see your businesses going?
I’m a little timid about that, which is another thing that Brian has been beating me over the head about. He’ll say things to me like what if I said you could earn this much money next year with your jewelry business, and I just look at him like he’s crazy. He’s dead serious, like no really, let’s talk about this. Of anybody I have talked to, Brian has really made me feel like okay, I can do this. He’s not just “rah, rah, go!” but instead gives me tools that have really helped me and made me start to believe, yeah I really can do this.

What do I want for this agency? I want it to be very relational, very personalized. I don’t have a vision for it to be huge. If I can’t give the families the kind of customer service that I believe in and believe is a strength as an agency, that means I’m probably going to need to get administrative help; somebody else will have to do other things so that I can do the relational aspect.

StartingUp has helped me to think in terms of growth, but not that it turns into something that I don’t want it to be. Just being able to express that, the Starting Up process has helped me define those things.


If you are interested in being a part of East Wind Nannies, visit their website. To contact Randi directly, call 312-650-9396.

Self-Curating Communities - Can It Be Done?

L. Brian Jenkins, MA - Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Posted by Brian Jenkins

A few weeks ago, StartingUp Now had the privilege of being invited to participate in the Techweek 2012 Conference + Expo.

It was both an honor and great experience to learn that Chicago has a burgeoning tech community that may soon rival Silicon Valley! What was immediately obvious is that the Chicago Tech Community knew each other via both their professional and personal relationships.

Techweek simply provided another opportunity for the "community" to officially gather, collaborate, grow deeper and share. It was affirming to see that an idea could literally "host" an event and create meaningful engagement at many levels. Though at a conference of several hundred companies—many of which were being introduced to each other for the first time—there was a sense of genuine authenticity in this large, entrepreneurial gathering. Maybe I was just new to the party as the person “from the outside looking in," but it was refreshing all the same.

Similarly, almost 20 years ago, I settled into an urban community on Chicago's west side, moved by my Christian faith and filled with a hopeful desire for connectedness and engagement. Admittedly, there was much learning and relationship building to be done with those sharing similar values and a serious commitment to see real change occur. Those in our network were younger, optimistic, and looked at challenge as opportunity.

Many years later, the increasing weight of what we were really up against in our community change efforts (i.e. structural issues and systems) became more apparent—and our optimism began to wane. Many individuals and families left. Some moved on to pursue new interests and/or new careers while others relocated to be closer to family. Others just gave up and moved on.  Maybe we were too tight-knit, too homogenous, too like-minded and needed space to grow and be influenced by others not in our immediate community. Who really knows?

As StartingUp Now proceeds to enter unfamiliar networks and communities as a "newcomer” in these spaces, I'm mindful of the experiences and opportunities that have moved me in this direction. I'm also hopeful that "curating community" through social media will extend our ability to connect with others who share similar values, dreams and ambitions.

Yet, I'm optimistic that a "self-curating community" (i.e. tech, startup, social enterprise, etc.) will listen to new ideas, seek collaboration vs. isolation, and incorporate the voices of others that empower individuals and groups. Communities must be given the freedom to decide their own reality.

I believe it’s for this reason that we, as entrepreneurs, are drawn to self-curating communities as it provides a forum to not only share our ideas while engaging with others’ unique concepts, but are then encouraged to push one another to the limit in our viewpoints and activities. Simply put, we are given a chance to try and try again.

Teen Entrepreneur Spotlight: Rebekah Willis

L. Brian Jenkins, MA - Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Posted by Grace Yi

 

 

People are always asking us, "Who is StartingUp Now for?" Our answer: Whoever wants to start a business!

The accessibility and simplicity of StartingUp Now has benefited both youth and adults alike, including budding teen entrepreneurs like Rebekah Willis.

Rebekah, 16, and her two siblings got their first taste of entrepreneurship two years ago under Brian Jenkins' leadership as he guided them through the completion of their business plans. It was during this time that Brian developed the content for his book, StartingUp Now: 24 Steps to Launch Your Own Business, and tested his concepts on the Willis siblings. Their training culminated into a business pitch presentation in front of several business and community leaders who provided critical feedback on the viability of their business plans.

Currently, Rebekah operates a growing granola business from her home, stating, "I'm excited and a little nervous about this venture. The response has been huge."

Bright, talented, and industrious, Rebekah represents the new generation of young entrepreneurs who are juggling multiple projects and responsibilities. Hailing from a family of 10 children, Rebekah is a home schooled student, part-time graphic designer and editor for Enduring Endeavors II, Inc., and performs in a music group.

As one of her dozens of customers, I've had the pleasure of enjoying her delicious, homemade granola and was excited to catch up with her for this recent interview.

Did you ever see yourself as an entrepreneur? Why did you start your business?

Proverbs 31 in the Bible describes a woman of noble virtue. She has many home-oriented characteristics and one of them is the ability to produce marketable goods and sell them. This spring, I had the privilege to join about twenty youth in an Irish music competition. We took first in regionals, so we will compete at the world championship in Ireland...and I have to pay my way. So I pulled Grandma's old granola recipe out and put it to work. My intentions were not--and still are not--to start a huge business, but to earn money while still fulfilling my responsibilities at home.

Everyone experiences challenges in the process of starting a business. What have been the most surprising challenges you've faced?

I made my fundraising intentions clear from the start. Many friends and neighbors who have had my granola in the past have been very supportive. Their word-of-mouth marketing is my best marketing tool. One lady commented that she appreciates someone working hard to earn money rather than asking for donations. However, not all customers have been easy to work with. After a scheduled pick-up date, I still have bags of granola sitting by the front door. I have found that communication with customers is vital, but it is hard to work with their shortcomings.

How has StartingUp Now helped you in your business planning?

StartingUp Now helped me most with the financial side of entrepreneurship. I learned about startup-costs, on-going costs, gross income, and net income. I learned how to set prices so I cover my costs with buffer room and how to be competitive at the same time.

What advice or key takeaways can you share with other new or aspiring entrepreneurs?

First, be ready for some hard work. It may not pay off right away, but it will strengthen the business and it will strengthen you. I had to stir about 50 pounds of oats on one day. I had some sore forearms that week! But when a customer later asked if my mom helped me or if I did everything myself, I was able to confirm my own work and give her reason to trust me and my business.

Second, communicate. A tech-reliant culture creates more opportunities to promote your business, but it also makes customers more reliant on reminders. Don't hound them all week--personally, I would delete nagging messages sent to me. Be wise in your timing. Be brief. Be consistent.

Third, start simply. Rather than offering variety, start with your niche. Now that I have a good customer base and a good reputation, I can start selling scones or cinnamon rolls or other goodies. But to start with everything at once would be overwhelming to me and perhaps produce a product of lesser quality.

How can people interested in ordering your granola contact you?

You can reach me at rebekahlynn@me.com.

 

CHICAGO+acumen Presents The Moral Pitch

Grace Yi - Monday, May 14, 2012

Guest Post by CHICAGO+acumen

 

Seeing is Believing at The Moral Pitch: A Demo for Decency Event

Tired of hearing people talk about "saving the world?" Snoozefest...ZzzZzz...We were too! So we created a competition to feature those rare social innovators with visions big enough to actually do it and with solutions tangible enough to prove it.

On May 24, 2012, CHICAGO+acumen would like to welcome supporters of social enterprise and social change to The Moral Pitch: A Demo for Decency. Hosted at Chicago's newest innovation hub, 1871, The Moral Pitch is a business pitch competition showcasing innovators with demo-ready products and solutions that directly address social needs. Four social enterprises will compete to win prizes and services that help foster the growth of their endeavors and help achieve the visions that they've demo-ed.

All proceeds of the event will go to Acumen Fund, a non-profit venture fund that has pioneered a model that combines the best of charity and economic markets to change the way the world tackles poverty! Since its founding in 2001, Acumen Fund has invested more than $70 million of philanthropic capital in 65 breakthrough enterprises that serve the poor by providing access to health, energy, housing, water, agriculture, and education to low-income customers in South Asia, East Africa, and West Africa.

CHICAGO+acumen is a volunteer-organized chapter that supports the mission of Acumen Fund by spreading awareness of its pioneering work and fundraising to expand the growth of its projects. We are excited to show off the bold ingenuity of Chicago-based social entrepreneurs and to invite fans of social change in on the spectacle. If you're interested in seeing how a "saved world" will be achieved, or in meeting other local dreamers, do-gooders, and changemakers, The Moral Pitch: A Demo for Decency is the must attend event.

To find out more details about the event and purchase tickets to attend, please visit our event page, www.moralpitch.com, or visit us on Facebook.

 

 

Do Your Values Guide Your Business?

Grace Yi - Tuesday, May 01, 2012

 Posted by Brian Jenkins

 

"Core values. Is it how much something is worth?" asked Melody, a Chicago high school student. "If it doesn't directly impact my bottom line, how are values even relevant?"

This interaction with a student working on her first business plan struck the classroom instructor, which led to my visit.

The business venture that Melody and her team were pursuing was more than just a little "risque." Though the team had conceptualized a provocative business idea, its members faced challenges in moving past the first step of the StartingUp Now guidebook: Core Values. With profitability being the team's primary driver, aspects of the business's impact on its employees and their community--as well as the owners themselves--waned in comparison to their goal in "making money."

I was more than willing to visit the classroom and interact with the student team per the teacher's request, having experienced many of the same challenges that educators face in working with aspiring youth entrepreneurs.

Core Values acts as the first step in the StartingUp Now business guidebook, setting a foundation for the entrepreneur in thinking through their business idea. It's quite interesting to hear the various comments through my interaction with users--especially younger readers--who don't see the direct connection between how our values guide all aspects of our lives...even business operations.

Values are taught--historically at home, reinforced in school, and esconced through our peer groups. Values are not intrinsic--they are a learned behavior. As the traditional value reinforcers (i.e. home, school, religious institutions) are being replaced or expanded via social networks and media, where are students "learning" their values from?

This is why Core Values precedes all the other steps in the StartingUp Now guidebook. We want the future entrepreneur to make the correlation between their values and their business operations. I want people to struggle and force themselves through this section...even coming back to rewrite their values after discovering their own.

Entrepreneurship training is life training. By simply discussing Step 1: Core Values, the students and I were able to discover they actually do have values beyond the goal of generating profit, such as family, safety and stability. They simply were not making the connection between the influence that their values had on their business operations--that, in many ways, their values as a business were very much a reflection of themselves. Values act as a compass in making one's decisions, or as one of the students said, "It's like a GPS for our company, it helps us not to get lost."

Through the process of "facilitating vs. lecturing," the students and I, in an open-ended discussion, navigated various business scenarios that taught them how different types of values were profitable but harmful. They are now discovering their own personal values through their business planning process.

While wrapping up, a student named Hector asked, "Do you think an investor would invest in a business like ours?" He was thinking more like an entrepreneur than he realized. Through the process of engagement, the act of listening, and the encouragement for students to be empowered in their curiosity and choices, adult entrepreneurs can help shape the values of future entrepreneurs worldwide.

What do you think? Do core values guide business operations? How do you determine your core values?


Share your comments here or with the global business community on the Skillcenter message board.


Be Human, Do Good

Grace Yi - Thursday, March 22, 2012

 Posted by Grace Yi 

 

 

Do you believe in change?

Let me rephrase that. Do you believe that you and I can make a significant, lasting impact on society that affects the lives of people in a positive way?

I do. And so do a lot of other people. Everyone, however, seems to have an idea on how change can--or can't--occur. But ideas are fruitless without real action.

Luckily, there are unique and creative forums to exchange ideas and best practices with individuals and organizations that are doing just that: taking action to make big impact.

Such is the case with The !deation Conference, which will be held this May 7-9 in Chicago, IL. Intentionally formatted to create a rich learning and sharing experience, the conference will gather some of the most innovative thinkers and practitioners in the social good space (e.g., for-profit businesses, nonprofit organizations, influencers, etc.) to assist current professionals in their respective social impact work.

We're honored to be presenting at The !deation Conference with other influencers and look forward to sharing how a simple, effective, and scalable system such as StartingUp Now can be a model for others looking to help individuals and groups create their own opportunities.

Check out the website here and make sure to use the promotion code "startingup" to save 15% off your registration.

Student Entrepreneurs at LYDIA

Grace Yi - Thursday, March 01, 2012

Posted by Grace Yi 

 

A few months ago, I had the chance to sit down with Travis Satterlee for an interview about his work with youth and teaching entrepreneurship in the classroom. Travis, having worked through the Entrenuity model over the past several years, has most recently been working through the StartingUp Now book, guiding students through their team-based business plan.

Travis is both a teacher and licensed clinical counselor working at the Lydia Urban Academy and Lydia Counseling Center at LYDIA, an organization that has, for almost a century, served children and families in communities across the country.

 


 

Can you provide some background on your students and the work you do with them?

At the Urban Academy, students are primarily Hispanic between the ages of 14 and 20. My job is to provide the students the opportunity to consider entrepreneurship as a Plan B for their lives. More than anything, I’m surprised by the students who are sparked by the idea of entrepreneurship as an option for their future path. The ones who connect with entrepreneurship have the aptitude for running with an idea or a vision with the realization that they finally have an outlet for their creative tendencies.

I was trained under the Entrenuity curriculum and have been implementing entrepreneurship in the classroom pushing for economic literacy. I’ve primarily used the business simulation games and work cards to help student groups create a business plan and start operational businesses such as a coffee shop, a garden project, and a vending machine business. Both the vending machine business and coffee shop operated for 2 years while the garden, though still operating, has been taken over by the residential program and has not had students engaged for awhile.

What are the most important and valuable tools necessary to teach entrepreneurship while engaging students in an effective way?

Exposing them to professionals and sectors that are interesting to them is crucial. So is the importance of experiential learning within the classroom setting to where they personally connect with the concept of running a business. Once doors are opened to the prospect of opportunity, the steps that lead them to small successes help set the foundation for them to keep pushing and moving forward with their activities.

What challenges have you and the students faced in the business planning and operations process?

Students did an excellent job in envisioning ideas and completing their business plans, but had a difficult time staying committed throughout the operation of the business after it launched. The most significant challenge that we’ve faced in helping students launch businesses through the school has been in student retention and engagement in the projects. People (both students and staff) regularly get cycled out and move on with their lives after graduating (or moving onto a new job) and don’t stick around. This makes it difficult engaging new students who were never a part of the initial business planning process like the individuals who shaped it from the beginning. Additionally, I work with a very diverse group of students that make it challenging to implement differentiated learning activities. A facilitator and school’s capacity to help support the students’ learning as well as operations is incredibly important, which educators should take into strong consideration if they plan on seeing these projects through long-term.

What has been most inspiring in teaching students about entrepreneurship? What words of wisdom can you share from your personal experience as an educator?

The key takeaways from my experience are found in the hope that entrepreneurship provides youth in enhancing their ability to make decisions for their future—independent from the constraints and challenges they may be facing. The other important value is the opportunity to help them develop healthy relationships through a classroom context, which will shape their personal and professional trajectory.

I think it’s important to have small, attainable goals that help encourage students feel confident and successful. Goals don’t have to be huge—like starting big businesses—but when you identify and attain some smaller goals, the skills and outcomes in reaching those goals are the valuable takeaways.

Impacting the Marketplace: The Grove City Story

Grace Yi - Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Guest Post by Carl Catedral

 

I moved to Grove City, PA in January 2010 from Phoenix, AZ to help my mentor Brad McKoy and friend Jessie Marquis establish the Antioch Overflow Experiment (AOX). AOX is unique in that we are a church that acts as a hybrid between a non-profit and a community development company. We are a simple church-planting community that meets in places where life happens—our houses, college dorms, parks, coffee shops, etc.—while following Jesus in everyday ways. Our desire as a community is to be a HUB that trains and equips college students and recent graduates to recognize that they can impact the marketplace and their communities by pursuing their God-given passions and putting their dreams to action. We do this through our mission training school like SCPx, summer internship programs, and weekly and monthly gatherings; but mostly, teaching and training happens experientially in everyday living shared in community.

The desire to equip college students to impact the marketplace and pursue their passions led me to recognize the importance of pursuing my own passions. I firmly believe individuals’ dreams and ideas will change the world and impact the marketplace in new and unprecedented ways. But talk is one thing. It's easy to inspire people to pursue their dreams, but what does it look like to actually help them make dreams become reality?  This is where my aspiration for helping people through entrepreneurship came alive. I began looking around Grove City to find out what our community's needs were. This led me to interact with local Grove City merchants.

As an AOX community, we frequented our local coffee shop Beans on Broad and built a relationship with Micaela, the owner. As I interacted with her, I discovered she needed help with basic marketing and social media to generate buzz in the community and promote the local bands that would play at the coffee shop on weekends. I set up Twitter campaigns that allowed for community interaction through special deals and discounts while managing her Facebook page to keep people updated on events and promote the bands that would be playing. In the process, consumer interest was generated and the buzz around the coffee shop’s activities substantially increased the number of people showing up to events and engaging in the Twitter campaigns—all of which helped to increase Beans on Broad's bottom line.

Through this experience, I have been able to build relationships with the community, learn and develop new skills in marketing and social media, and get compensated through free drinks and food at the coffee shop. However, the biggest gain was the relationships and opportunities that came with it. As I grew in confidence and got my feet wet, friends in the community would come to me or introduce me to people who needed help with their businesses and/or ideas.

In the pasts five months, I have had the honor to work with a writer, an entrepreneur in computer networking and technology, two local Grove City merchants, and an inventor who has come up with a new design for an energy-efficient windmill. Each of these individuals or businesses has a unique story. It has been my passion to enhance the value of their business or venture by knowing their story and helping them implement their ideas in an effective way so as to share their stories and causes with the larger public. This has looked differently in many ways thus far—with everything from social media and marketing to editing, package design consulting, and idea implementation.

What I have learned in the process is that I can't help people if I first don't know what I can offer them. I have realized the need to implement my own ideas and business strategies so I can best serve people. That's where StartingUp Now has been an incredible resource for me and my community. Working through the book and my business plan while talking with the team has led me to realize the practical things I need to do in order to pursue my dreams and set up my business, so that I can effectively help others pursue and implement their own dreams in sustainable ways.

My biggest joy has been collaborating with my friends in the AOX community. My friend Micah List and I have been working through the StartingUp Now book together, and in the process, our friendship has grown richer as we have helped each other pursue our ideas. Micah started a hat-making business when he was fifteen and provided jobs for four women in the Dominican Republic, but it wasn't sustainable because he didn't have the experience, knowledge, or community support to help his idea thrive. Now things are different. He is starting his business up again, but this time we are working with people like Stephanie Kunes, an up-and-coming graphic designer; Alex Catedral, a creative visionary in music recording and production; Lydia Medill, a singer and songwriter with a passion for language; Jasmine Tate, a talented musician and producer, and so many others who are supporting one another, pursuing their passions, and realizing their dreams.

In my pursuit to help create opportunities for others as a new entrepreneur, I have learned the power of community. As a member of AOX, we are seeing our local Grove City community impacted as we collectively pursue our dreams. Our dream as a community is to impact the marketplace and make a difference in campuses, cities, and nations. We are just normal everyday people, following Jesus in everyday ways, and believing that our dreams and ideas can change the world. This is just the beginning. Stay tuned to see how the story unfolds...

 

 

 

You can follow Carl Catedral and the AOX community on Twitter.

 

Believing Bigger

Grace Yi - Thursday, February 16, 2012

Posted by Grace Yi

 

                   

 

Do you dream? What is your dream? And do you think your dream can come true?

Or how about this: do you think you can make your dream become a reality?

I appreciate the advice that Justin Ahrens, the Principal and Creative Director of design firm Rule29, shares on his blog about the topic of believing in something bigger, and more meaningful, in one's life pursuits. It's a good reminder to take pause and reflect on the things that drive us and our activities.

Why do we do what we do? You've probably woken up at some point in your life and said to yourself, "What's it all about anyway? Do I really need to go in today and deal with the same old stuff?" Even if you have the greatest job in the universe, moments like this have a way of seeping into your mind occasionally. But if thoughts like these linger, or if you are looking for a new perspective, here is the perfect suggestion: Find something to believe in—something that is bigger than you.

In the end, work is just work. What is guiding you to make the choices you make? Your passion? What you think is right? Your friends? Your faith? Whatever your outlook, believing in something bigger than you helps to put all of the aspects of your life into perspective. We all have something that guides us, something that we are meant to pay attention to. Along the way, it's important for us to figure out what our priorities are and keep ourselves in check.

We are here to do something other than just work. Our work is important, even if it merely serves to meet our basic needs, but we are all a part of something bigger, and we are designed to play a unique part in that community. Maybe this is the area of your life that needs the most attention; it might even be time for a reboot.

This is a topic worthy of discussing because most of us at some point encounter a nagging sense of doubt that causes us to question what this whole rat race is about. Getting some definition of that for yourself really helps align and adjust work and put it in its proper place.

What that actually means for you is part of the adventure. Start, restart, or continue to pay attention to what is bigger than you. It will provide the ultimate clarity that helps you sleep at night and gets you out of bed in the morning.

People on their deathbeds do not wish that they had worked more. When reflecting on their lives, they may wish they had loved, played, explored, served, and lived more instead of working so hard chasing fame and fortune. If you don't have a job that fuels your life or live a life that fuels your work, then look at your focus, your reason for doing, your passion . . . the answer lies there.

How to Look at Believing Bigger

Do you have passion in your work? In your personal life? If the answer is yes, then can you do more of that? If the answer is no, how can you add some of that back into your life? If work is causing your life to be blurry, upside down, empty, shallow, or meaningless, it's time to call a timeout. Why are you doing what you are doing? Remember the things that fueled your passion and go back to them. What adjustments can be made? Don't be overwhelmed—you can do only one thing at a time, but the path needs to start somewhere, so move where you feel led to go.

For more check out the book Life Kerning.

Original blog post here.


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